Research Notes

Midwest Popular Culture Asssociation Conference
October 14-16 2005
St. Louis
deadline: April 30, 2005
                  Cleveland Symposium
Cleveland Museum of ARt
April 15, 2005
deadline: PaST

********** ISSUE *******

Purpose:
To understand the Zapatista Doll interms of global politics and intersecting cultures.

Research Question:
What do the Zapatista Dolls mean to the intersecting cultures of indigenous Chamula and international tourism?

Hypothesis:
The makers of the Zapatista dolls are not Zapatistas. They are women in the crossfire. The dolls they make carry Zapatista ideology into the tourist market and capatilist ideology into indigenous craft production.

Thesis:


Major Points
    the dolls are a product of indigenous culture catering to the demands of global tourism
    They represent an intersectiton of ancient tradition with superpower politics
    The accept and defy globalization


********** BACKGROUND *******

Background



Signifigance



********** METHODOLOGY ***************

Research at UofL guided by David Horvath and Mary Carothers.

********* LIMITATIONS OF RESEARCH *********
************ PROGRESS ****************

*********** CURRENT STATUS ***********

Established connections and friendships with important Chamulan dollmakers
Opened doors into Tzotzil culture
Established connections with the EZLN, human rights activists, and Mexican Government officials in Chiapas.
Developed understanding of Chiapeneca History and Politics
Collected video and photo documentation of doll making techniques
Collected video and photo documentation of life in Chiapas
Organizing & distributing information at www.zapatistadolls.com
Sharing Research at Academic Symposium & with local organizations (KITLAC, Sevn Counties, The Kentucky Foundation for Women)


************ RESULTS **************


******* FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS ********

Return to San Christobal and Chamula in the Fall of 2005 for further instruction from the Tzotzil dollmakers.
Stregnthen understanding of Chamulan culture & the effects of globalization on the Modern Maya in Chiapas.
Video document ancient practices of shearing, felting, weaving, and dying lambs wool (sacrid item and primary doll making material).
Organize research material for publication.
Edit video to create a short documentary film.
Print photos and collect dolls for U.S. exhibition.





















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